Editorial:
The Web's Inventor Doesn't Recognize his Brainchild

Tuesday, 27 April 2019

English computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web, delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland, March 12, 2019 marking 30 years of World Wide Web. [Fabrice Coffrini/Pool, Keystone via AP]

English computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee, best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web, delivers a speech during an event at the CERN in Meyrin near Geneva, Switzerland, March 12, 2019 marking 30 years of World Wide Web.
[Fabrice Coffrini/Pool, Keystone via AP]

At CERN's 'Web(at)30' conference, Sir Tim [Berners-Lee] admitted: "the web is not the web we wanted in every respect."

In an article published on the Web's anniversary, Berners-Lee says the Web has "given a voice to those who spread hatred" and turned it into a nest for criminals and scammers of all kinds.

"As the web reshapes our world, we have a responsibility to make sure it is recognized as a human right and built for the public good ... The fight for the web is one of the most important causes of our time.  Today, half of the world is online.  It is more urgent than ever to ensure the other half are not left behind offline, and that everyone contributes to a web that drives equality, opportunity and creativity,"

Principles that involves governments, companies, and users to get the Web back on track.

In Berners-Lee words,:
"It would be defeatist and unimaginative to assume that the web as we know it can't be changed for the better in the next 30.  If we give up on building a better web now, then the web will not have failed us.  We will have failed the web."

Tristan Harris called for designers and developers to consider how their products affect the human brain. [JOSHUA BLANCHARD/GETTY IMAGES]

Tristan Harris called for designers and developers to consider how their products affect the human brain.
[JOSHUA BLANCHARD/GETTY IMAGES]

Meanwhile, in the TIMES newspaper in London, former Google Engineer Tristan Harris, warns that technology has begun to overwhelm human instincts and emotions.

He went on to say that tech giants such as Facebook "have amplified feelings of outrage, polarisation and vanity, caused smartphone addiction and a sense of information overload", overwhelming our own identities.

Further Reading

[1]: At age 30, World Wide Web is 'not the web we wanted'

[2]: 30 years on, what's next #ForTheWeb?

[3]: Human spirit being 'overwhelmed by tech giants'